The film talks about the allied rescue on the beach of Dunkirk
330,000 French, British, Belgian and Dutch soldiers were safely evacuated. Under air and ground cover from British and French forces.

Christopher Nolan is a visual genius: this film is just stunning to look at. From the bullets flying near soldier’s head to gorgeous explosions, it transports you right into the war zone within the first 10 minutes of the screening. Furthermore, it is an accurate description of the “Miracle of Dunkirk”.

Initially focusing on one soldier, Fionn Whitehead, who joins the thousands of British troops trapped on the beach waiting to be evacuated the film opens out into three distinct areas, The Mule, essentially a pier where the massed troops wait to board naval ships overseen by Kenneth Branagh’s naval commander , The Sea, which focuses on a small leisure boat captained by Mark Rylance and his two sons who cross the channel in their bid to help with the evacuation and The Air where spitfire pilot Tom Hardy and two other pilots attempt to shoot down various German Luftwaffe planes intent on bombing the rescue ships at sea as well as the troops on the shore line. Each story ties in with the other and Nolan’s script cleverly shows the same moment from the three view points usually with a dilemma within each.

One scene, caught my attention when a group of Allied soldiers were surrounded in a ship and this same ship was being attacked on all sides by the German troops. One of the characters was being forced out of the ship to see if the tide sea was rising or not. Out of fear, this character did not want to leave the ship, it was when an English soldier replied: for the others to survive, one person has to die.

The theme of this film is survival, especially surviving in a difficult situation, is in itself a great victory




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